Weeds account for losses in crop yields, and this event might be exacerbated by salinity. Therefore, we investigated the responses of Chenopodium album L. and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) to salt stress, as well as interferences between species. Ten-day old plants were grown for 1 week in a single-or mixed-species set-up, either with or without 100 mM of NaCl. C. album reduced the biomass of soybean similarly to salt stress, while its growth was unaffected under any condition. C. album decreased the crop protein content when salinity was applied. This effect was ascribed to altered protein metabolism and/or N usage to produce other N metabolites, including osmolytes. The two species did not reciprocally affect the capacity to accumulate Na+, but the weed contained two-fold more Na+ in the leaves. Elevated initial K+ concentration and high K+ delivery to the shoot likely explained the better acclimation of C. album to salinity. C. album produced more phenolics and proline and exhibited greater antioxidant activity, but low lipid peroxidation, in the mixed set-up under salinity. Thus, it is possible that the weed could become more resilient to salinity when growing in a soybean field. In the long term, this might cause significant losses in soybean productivity as expected by the dramatic decline in crop protein content.

Short-term responses to salinity of soybean and chenopodium album grown in single and mixed-species hydroponic systems

Ghirardelli A.;Schiavon M.
;
Zanin G.;Masin R.
2021

Abstract

Weeds account for losses in crop yields, and this event might be exacerbated by salinity. Therefore, we investigated the responses of Chenopodium album L. and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) to salt stress, as well as interferences between species. Ten-day old plants were grown for 1 week in a single-or mixed-species set-up, either with or without 100 mM of NaCl. C. album reduced the biomass of soybean similarly to salt stress, while its growth was unaffected under any condition. C. album decreased the crop protein content when salinity was applied. This effect was ascribed to altered protein metabolism and/or N usage to produce other N metabolites, including osmolytes. The two species did not reciprocally affect the capacity to accumulate Na+, but the weed contained two-fold more Na+ in the leaves. Elevated initial K+ concentration and high K+ delivery to the shoot likely explained the better acclimation of C. album to salinity. C. album produced more phenolics and proline and exhibited greater antioxidant activity, but low lipid peroxidation, in the mixed set-up under salinity. Thus, it is possible that the weed could become more resilient to salinity when growing in a soybean field. In the long term, this might cause significant losses in soybean productivity as expected by the dramatic decline in crop protein content.
2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3399595
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