Aims: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a severe complication of diabetes, characterized by defective traffic of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). We examined the hematopoietic versus nonhematopoietic role of p66Shc in regulating HSPC traffic and blood flow recovery after ischemia in diabetic mice. Results: Using streptozotocin-induced diabetes, chimeric mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ bone marrow (BM), and the hind limb ischemia model, we found that the physiologic mobilization and homing of HSPCs were abolished by diabetes, along with impaired vascular recovery. Hematopoietic deletion of p66Shc, obtained by transplanting p66Shc-/- BM cells into wild-type (Wt) recipients, but not nonhematopoietic deletion, constrained hyperglycemia-induced myelopoiesis, rescued postischemic HSPC mobilization, and improved blood flow recovery in diabetic mice. In Wt diabetic mice transplanted with BM cells from GFP+p66Shc-/- mice, the amount of HSPCs homed to ischemic muscles was greater than in mice transplanted with GFP+p66Shc+/+ cells, with recruited cells displaying higher expression of adhesion molecules and Vegf. In 40 patients with diabetes, p66Shc gene expression in mononuclear cells was correlated with myelopoiesis and elevated in the presence of PAD. In 13 patients with diabetes and PAD, p66Shc expression in HSPC-mobilized peripheral blood cells was inversely correlated with VEGF expression. Innovation: For the first time, we dissect the role of hematopoietic versus nonhematopoietic p66Shc in regulating HSPC traffic and ischemic responses. Conclusion: Hematopoietic deletion of p66Shc was sufficient to rescue HSPC mobilization and homing in diabetes after ischemia and improved blood flow recovery. Inhibiting p66Shc in blood cells may be a novel strategy to counter PAD in diabetes.

Hematopoietic and Nonhematopoietic p66Shc Differentially Regulates Stem Cell Traffic and Vascular Response to Ischemia in Diabetes

Albiero, Mattia;D'Anna, Marianna;Bonora, Benedetta Maria;Zuccolotto, Gaia;Rosato, Antonio;Giorgio, Marco;Iori, Elisabetta;Avogaro, Angelo;Fadini, Gian Paolo
2022

Abstract

Aims: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a severe complication of diabetes, characterized by defective traffic of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). We examined the hematopoietic versus nonhematopoietic role of p66Shc in regulating HSPC traffic and blood flow recovery after ischemia in diabetic mice. Results: Using streptozotocin-induced diabetes, chimeric mice with green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ bone marrow (BM), and the hind limb ischemia model, we found that the physiologic mobilization and homing of HSPCs were abolished by diabetes, along with impaired vascular recovery. Hematopoietic deletion of p66Shc, obtained by transplanting p66Shc-/- BM cells into wild-type (Wt) recipients, but not nonhematopoietic deletion, constrained hyperglycemia-induced myelopoiesis, rescued postischemic HSPC mobilization, and improved blood flow recovery in diabetic mice. In Wt diabetic mice transplanted with BM cells from GFP+p66Shc-/- mice, the amount of HSPCs homed to ischemic muscles was greater than in mice transplanted with GFP+p66Shc+/+ cells, with recruited cells displaying higher expression of adhesion molecules and Vegf. In 40 patients with diabetes, p66Shc gene expression in mononuclear cells was correlated with myelopoiesis and elevated in the presence of PAD. In 13 patients with diabetes and PAD, p66Shc expression in HSPC-mobilized peripheral blood cells was inversely correlated with VEGF expression. Innovation: For the first time, we dissect the role of hematopoietic versus nonhematopoietic p66Shc in regulating HSPC traffic and ischemic responses. Conclusion: Hematopoietic deletion of p66Shc was sufficient to rescue HSPC mobilization and homing in diabetes after ischemia and improved blood flow recovery. Inhibiting p66Shc in blood cells may be a novel strategy to counter PAD in diabetes.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3402345
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