Obesity and associated insulin resistance (Ins-R) have been identified as important risk factors for esophageal adenocarcinoma development. Elevated calories and protein consumption are also associated with Ins-R and glucose intolerance. We investigated the effect of a 24-month moderate calorie and protein restriction program on overweight or obese patients affected by Bar-rett’s esophagus (BE), as no similar dietary approach has been attempted to date in this disease context. Anthropometric parameters, levels of serum analytes related to obesity and Ins-R, and the esophageal insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway were analyzed. This study is registered with Clinical-Trials.gov, number NCT03813381. Insulin, C-peptide, IGF-1, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), adi-pokines, and esophageal expression of the main proteins involved in insulin/IGF-1 signal transduc-tion were quantified using Luminex-XMAP® technology in 46 patients who followed the restriction program (IA) and in 54 controls (CA). Body mass index and waist circumference significantly decreased in 76.1% of IA and 35.2% of CA. IGF-1 levels were reduced in 71.7% of IA and 51.8% of CA. The simultaneous reduction of glycaemia, IGF-1, the IGF-1/IGFBP3 ratio, and the improvement in weight loss-dependent insulin sensitivity, were associated with the downregulation of the insu-lin/IGF-1 signal on BE tissue. The proposed intervention program was an effective approach to counteract obesity-associated cancer risk factors. The improvement in metabolic condition resulted in a downregulation of the ERK-mediated mitogenic signal in 43.5% of patients, probably affecting the molecular mechanism driving adenocarcinoma development in BE lesions.

Insulin/igf-1 signaling is downregulated in barrett’s esophagus patients undergoing a moderate calorie and protein restriction program: A randomized 2-year trial

Arcidiacono D.;Zaramella A.;Fabris F.;Sanchez-Rodriguez R.;Fassan M.;Nardi M.;Benna C.;Pucciarelli S.;
2021

Abstract

Obesity and associated insulin resistance (Ins-R) have been identified as important risk factors for esophageal adenocarcinoma development. Elevated calories and protein consumption are also associated with Ins-R and glucose intolerance. We investigated the effect of a 24-month moderate calorie and protein restriction program on overweight or obese patients affected by Bar-rett’s esophagus (BE), as no similar dietary approach has been attempted to date in this disease context. Anthropometric parameters, levels of serum analytes related to obesity and Ins-R, and the esophageal insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway were analyzed. This study is registered with Clinical-Trials.gov, number NCT03813381. Insulin, C-peptide, IGF-1, IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), adi-pokines, and esophageal expression of the main proteins involved in insulin/IGF-1 signal transduc-tion were quantified using Luminex-XMAP® technology in 46 patients who followed the restriction program (IA) and in 54 controls (CA). Body mass index and waist circumference significantly decreased in 76.1% of IA and 35.2% of CA. IGF-1 levels were reduced in 71.7% of IA and 51.8% of CA. The simultaneous reduction of glycaemia, IGF-1, the IGF-1/IGFBP3 ratio, and the improvement in weight loss-dependent insulin sensitivity, were associated with the downregulation of the insu-lin/IGF-1 signal on BE tissue. The proposed intervention program was an effective approach to counteract obesity-associated cancer risk factors. The improvement in metabolic condition resulted in a downregulation of the ERK-mediated mitogenic signal in 43.5% of patients, probably affecting the molecular mechanism driving adenocarcinoma development in BE lesions.
2021
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3410248
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