The age- and gender-related cardio-metabolic changes may limit the applicability of guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in older people. We investigated the association of cardiovascular risk profile with 20-year all-cause and CVD-mortality in older adults, focusing on age- and gender-specific differences. This prospective study involved 2895 community-dwelling individuals aged ≥65 years who participated in the Pro.V.A study. The sum of achieved target levels (smoking, diet, physical activity, body weight, blood pressure, lipids, and diabetes) recommended by the European Society of Cardiology 2016 guidelines was assessed in each participant. From this sum, cardiovascular risk profile was categorised as very high (0–2), high (3), medium (4), low (5), and very low (6–7 target levels achieved). All-cause and CV mortality data over 20 years were obtained from health registers. At Cox regression, lower cardiovascular risk profile was associated with reduced 20-year all-cause mortality in both genders, with stronger results for women (HR = 0.42 [95%CI:0.25–0.69] and HR = 0.61 [95%CI:0.42–0.89] for very low vs. very high cardiovascular risk profile in women and men, respectively). This trend was more marked for CVD mortality. Lower cardiovascular risk profile was associated with reduced all-cause and CVD mortality only in men < 75 years, while the associations persisted in the oldest old women. A lower cardiovascular risk profile, as defined by current guidelines, may reduce all-cause and CVD mortality in older people, with stronger and longer benefits in women. These findings suggest that personalised and life-course approaches considering gender and age differences may improve the delivery of preventive actions in older people.

Cardiovascular risk profiles and 20-year mortality in older people: gender differences in the Pro.V.A. study

Trevisan C.
;
Fedeli U.;Baggio G.;Manzato E.;Maggi S.;Sergi G.
2021

Abstract

The age- and gender-related cardio-metabolic changes may limit the applicability of guidelines for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in older people. We investigated the association of cardiovascular risk profile with 20-year all-cause and CVD-mortality in older adults, focusing on age- and gender-specific differences. This prospective study involved 2895 community-dwelling individuals aged ≥65 years who participated in the Pro.V.A study. The sum of achieved target levels (smoking, diet, physical activity, body weight, blood pressure, lipids, and diabetes) recommended by the European Society of Cardiology 2016 guidelines was assessed in each participant. From this sum, cardiovascular risk profile was categorised as very high (0–2), high (3), medium (4), low (5), and very low (6–7 target levels achieved). All-cause and CV mortality data over 20 years were obtained from health registers. At Cox regression, lower cardiovascular risk profile was associated with reduced 20-year all-cause mortality in both genders, with stronger results for women (HR = 0.42 [95%CI:0.25–0.69] and HR = 0.61 [95%CI:0.42–0.89] for very low vs. very high cardiovascular risk profile in women and men, respectively). This trend was more marked for CVD mortality. Lower cardiovascular risk profile was associated with reduced all-cause and CVD mortality only in men < 75 years, while the associations persisted in the oldest old women. A lower cardiovascular risk profile, as defined by current guidelines, may reduce all-cause and CVD mortality in older people, with stronger and longer benefits in women. These findings suggest that personalised and life-course approaches considering gender and age differences may improve the delivery of preventive actions in older people.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3427982
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