Gamma-ray Bursts (GRB) were discovered by satellite-based detectors as powerful sources of transient γ-ray emission. The Fermi satellite detected an increasing number of these events with its dedicated Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), some of which were associated with high energy photons ($E gt 10$ GeV), by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). More recently, follow-up observations by Cherenkov telescopes detected very high energy emission ($E gt 100$ GeV) from GRBs, opening up a new observational window with implications on the interpretation of their central engines and on the propagation of very energetic photons across the Universe. Here, we use the data published in the 2nd Fermi-LAT Gamma Ray Burst Catalogue to characterize the duration, luminosity, redshift, and light curve of the high energy GRB emission. We extrapolate these properties to the very high energy domain, comparing the results with available observations and with the potential of future instruments. We use observed and simulated GRB populations to estimate the chances of detection with wide-field ground-based γ-ray instruments. Our analysis aims to evaluate the opportunities of the Southern Wide-field-of-view Gamma-ray Observatory (SWGO), to be installed in the Southern Hemisphere, to complement CTA. We show that a low-energy observing threshold ($E-{low} lt 200$ GeV), with good point source sensitivity ($F-{lim} approx 10^{-11} ,mathrm{erg, cm^{-2}, s^{-1}}$ in $1$ yr), are optimal requirements to work as a GRB trigger facility and to probe the burst spectral properties down to time-scales as short as $10$ s, accessing a time domain that will not be available to Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes instruments.

Gamma-ray burst detection prospects for next generation ground-based VHE facilities

La Mura G.;Barres De Almeida U.;De Angelis A.;Prandini E.;
2021

Abstract

Gamma-ray Bursts (GRB) were discovered by satellite-based detectors as powerful sources of transient γ-ray emission. The Fermi satellite detected an increasing number of these events with its dedicated Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), some of which were associated with high energy photons ($E gt 10$ GeV), by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). More recently, follow-up observations by Cherenkov telescopes detected very high energy emission ($E gt 100$ GeV) from GRBs, opening up a new observational window with implications on the interpretation of their central engines and on the propagation of very energetic photons across the Universe. Here, we use the data published in the 2nd Fermi-LAT Gamma Ray Burst Catalogue to characterize the duration, luminosity, redshift, and light curve of the high energy GRB emission. We extrapolate these properties to the very high energy domain, comparing the results with available observations and with the potential of future instruments. We use observed and simulated GRB populations to estimate the chances of detection with wide-field ground-based γ-ray instruments. Our analysis aims to evaluate the opportunities of the Southern Wide-field-of-view Gamma-ray Observatory (SWGO), to be installed in the Southern Hemisphere, to complement CTA. We show that a low-energy observing threshold ($E-{low} lt 200$ GeV), with good point source sensitivity ($F-{lim} approx 10^{-11} ,mathrm{erg, cm^{-2}, s^{-1}}$ in $1$ yr), are optimal requirements to work as a GRB trigger facility and to probe the burst spectral properties down to time-scales as short as $10$ s, accessing a time domain that will not be available to Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes instruments.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3435493
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