Objective: Children with leukaemia experience special difficulties adapting to stressful medical procedures and to the adverse effects of chemotherapy, though they can implement their coping strategies. The aims of the study were to assess whether the coping-with-pain strategies could be influenced by a child's personal and illness factors and to render possible comparisons between children with leukaemia and healthy peers. Another aim was to compare parents' and children's reports on coping strategies. Methods: A total of 125 patients (average age = 6.79 years; SD = 3.40) with acute leukaemia (lymphocytic leukaemia 90.4% and myeloid leukaemia 9.6%) and agematched healthy children with their parents were enrolled in the study. A sociodemographic questionnaire and the Waldon–Varni Pediatric Pain Coping Inventory, parent and self-report versions, were administered 1 month after diagnosis. Data regarding the therapy's side effects were recorded. Results: The comparison between proxy-reports of the two groups of parents found significant differences in terms of social support, self-cognitive instructions and catastrophising strategies. Children aged 6–10 years relied more heavily on distraction than children of other ages, using more problem-solving and self-cognitive instructions. The results indicated moderate parent–child agreement. Conclusion: Health professionals could help paediatric leukaemic patients in adopting more efficiently pain coping strategies applicable for different ages.

Pain coping strategies in paediatric patients newly diagnosed with leukaemia compared with healthy peers

Tremolada, Marta
;
Tasso, Giulia;Bonichini, Sabrina;Biffi, Alessandra;
2022

Abstract

Objective: Children with leukaemia experience special difficulties adapting to stressful medical procedures and to the adverse effects of chemotherapy, though they can implement their coping strategies. The aims of the study were to assess whether the coping-with-pain strategies could be influenced by a child's personal and illness factors and to render possible comparisons between children with leukaemia and healthy peers. Another aim was to compare parents' and children's reports on coping strategies. Methods: A total of 125 patients (average age = 6.79 years; SD = 3.40) with acute leukaemia (lymphocytic leukaemia 90.4% and myeloid leukaemia 9.6%) and agematched healthy children with their parents were enrolled in the study. A sociodemographic questionnaire and the Waldon–Varni Pediatric Pain Coping Inventory, parent and self-report versions, were administered 1 month after diagnosis. Data regarding the therapy's side effects were recorded. Results: The comparison between proxy-reports of the two groups of parents found significant differences in terms of social support, self-cognitive instructions and catastrophising strategies. Children aged 6–10 years relied more heavily on distraction than children of other ages, using more problem-solving and self-cognitive instructions. The results indicated moderate parent–child agreement. Conclusion: Health professionals could help paediatric leukaemic patients in adopting more efficiently pain coping strategies applicable for different ages.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3439886
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