The majority of the studies underlined how adolescent and young adult (AYA) Cancer Survivors had no significant differences in their well-being and quality of life compared with a control group of healthy counterparts, although French et al. (2013) found less years of education among cancer survivors. The present study aimed at comparing AYA cancer survivors and a control group of peers who had no history of serious illness, in terms of well-being, cognitive functioning, and perceptions of life. Participants in this study were 205 AYA cancer survivors, 126 males, off therapy from a mean of 10.87 years (SD = 4.91), with a mean age of 18.96 (SD = 3.08), recruited during follow-up visits and healthy counterparts (n = 205), matched for age and gender. They all completed self-report questionnaires: Ladder of Life, BSI-18 and Cognitive problems. Paired t test evidenced significant differences between survivors (Mean = 6.19; SD = 2.07) and controls (Mean = 6.88; SD = 2.02) in perceptions of quality of life regarding 5 years before the current time [t(204) = −3.39; p = 0.001], with a lower level for childhood cancer survivors. Specifically, Hierarchical regression (R2 = 0.05, p = 0.04) identified a shorter time since the completion of treatment (β = 0.18, p = 0.03) and a trend of stem cell transplantation experience (β = −0.11, p = 0.06) as factors associated with negative perception of precedent quality of life. The AYA cancer survivors reported lower cognitive difficulties (Mean = 1.46) than controls (Mean = 1.56) [t(204) = −3.41; p = 0.001]: in memory (Meanclinical = 1.32 vs Meancontrol = 1.50) [t(204) = −4.52; p = 0.001], in concentration (Meanclinical = 1.36 vs Meancontrol = 1.54) [t(204) = −4.66; p = 0.001] and in mental organization skills (Meanclinical = 1.47 vs Meancontrol = 1.56) [t(204) = −2.56; p = 0.01], even if they had a lower educational attainment [X2(9) = 131.28; p = 0.001]. They showed similar satisfaction with their psychological well-being and their lives as healthy counterparts, except for past life perceptions associated with the cancer period. Important recommendations for future research and clinical suggestions could be given.

Psychological Well-Being, Cognitive Functioning, and Quality of Life in 205 Adolescent and Young Adult Childhood Cancer Survivors Compared to Healthy Peers

Tremolada Marta
;
Bonichini Sabrina;Biffi Alessandra
2022

Abstract

The majority of the studies underlined how adolescent and young adult (AYA) Cancer Survivors had no significant differences in their well-being and quality of life compared with a control group of healthy counterparts, although French et al. (2013) found less years of education among cancer survivors. The present study aimed at comparing AYA cancer survivors and a control group of peers who had no history of serious illness, in terms of well-being, cognitive functioning, and perceptions of life. Participants in this study were 205 AYA cancer survivors, 126 males, off therapy from a mean of 10.87 years (SD = 4.91), with a mean age of 18.96 (SD = 3.08), recruited during follow-up visits and healthy counterparts (n = 205), matched for age and gender. They all completed self-report questionnaires: Ladder of Life, BSI-18 and Cognitive problems. Paired t test evidenced significant differences between survivors (Mean = 6.19; SD = 2.07) and controls (Mean = 6.88; SD = 2.02) in perceptions of quality of life regarding 5 years before the current time [t(204) = −3.39; p = 0.001], with a lower level for childhood cancer survivors. Specifically, Hierarchical regression (R2 = 0.05, p = 0.04) identified a shorter time since the completion of treatment (β = 0.18, p = 0.03) and a trend of stem cell transplantation experience (β = −0.11, p = 0.06) as factors associated with negative perception of precedent quality of life. The AYA cancer survivors reported lower cognitive difficulties (Mean = 1.46) than controls (Mean = 1.56) [t(204) = −3.41; p = 0.001]: in memory (Meanclinical = 1.32 vs Meancontrol = 1.50) [t(204) = −4.52; p = 0.001], in concentration (Meanclinical = 1.36 vs Meancontrol = 1.54) [t(204) = −4.66; p = 0.001] and in mental organization skills (Meanclinical = 1.47 vs Meancontrol = 1.56) [t(204) = −2.56; p = 0.01], even if they had a lower educational attainment [X2(9) = 131.28; p = 0.001]. They showed similar satisfaction with their psychological well-being and their lives as healthy counterparts, except for past life perceptions associated with the cancer period. Important recommendations for future research and clinical suggestions could be given.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3449304
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