According to FAO and WHO, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Most probiotic bacteria used today belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and are of animal or human origin. The fundamental characteristic routinely evaluated in potential probiotics strains is their limited viability loss during gastrointestinal transit (GIT), but to date, no studies reported whether probiotics, besides viability, still also maintain their beneficial properties intact. To study this aspect, we considered two strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus DTA 79 and L. paracasei DTA 83, previously characterised for the presence of some probiotic properties, isolated from faeces of 7- to 21-day-old babies. Here, we examined some additional properties, namely antibiotic resistance, resistance to lysozyme, presence of haemolytic activity and inhibition of pathogen biofilm formation. We then tested the effect of in vitro GIT on all these features and our results show evidence that this procedure had in some cases limited and in others no significant effects on them. Additionally, we examined the gastrointestinal resistance of the strains after skim milk fermentation and successive storage of the product for 20 and 40 days at refrigeration temperature, to see whether prolonged storage could weaken cell resistance to GIT. Our results demonstrate that a protracted refrigeration period before in vitro GIT did not affect or influenced very weakly this essential probiotic property.

Safety and Stability of Two Potentially Probiotic Lactobacillus Strains After In Vitro Gastrointestinal Transit

Lemos Junior, Wilson José Fernandes
Formal Analysis
;
Tarrah, Armin
Conceptualization
;
da Silva Duarte, Vinícius
Methodology
;
Giacomini, Alessio
Supervision
;
Corich, Viviana
Funding Acquisition
2020

Abstract

According to FAO and WHO, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms that, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Most probiotic bacteria used today belong to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium and are of animal or human origin. The fundamental characteristic routinely evaluated in potential probiotics strains is their limited viability loss during gastrointestinal transit (GIT), but to date, no studies reported whether probiotics, besides viability, still also maintain their beneficial properties intact. To study this aspect, we considered two strains, Lactobacillus rhamnosus DTA 79 and L. paracasei DTA 83, previously characterised for the presence of some probiotic properties, isolated from faeces of 7- to 21-day-old babies. Here, we examined some additional properties, namely antibiotic resistance, resistance to lysozyme, presence of haemolytic activity and inhibition of pathogen biofilm formation. We then tested the effect of in vitro GIT on all these features and our results show evidence that this procedure had in some cases limited and in others no significant effects on them. Additionally, we examined the gastrointestinal resistance of the strains after skim milk fermentation and successive storage of the product for 20 and 40 days at refrigeration temperature, to see whether prolonged storage could weaken cell resistance to GIT. Our results demonstrate that a protracted refrigeration period before in vitro GIT did not affect or influenced very weakly this essential probiotic property.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3303677
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