High milk somatic cell count (SCC) influences milk production and quality; however, very little is known about the effect of low SCC on milk quality, especially in terms of mineral content and coagulation properties. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of somatic cell score (SCS), calculated as log2(SCC/100) + 3, on milk yield, composition (fat, crude protein, casein, lactose, milk urea nitrogen, protein fractions, and mineral contents), and coagulation properties of Brown Swiss, Holstein Friesian, and Simmental cows from multibreed herds. Milk composition and coagulation traits were predicted using mid-infrared spectroscopy. The data set comprised 95,591 observations of 6,940 cows in 313 multibreed herds, collected from January 2011 to December 2017. Observations were divided into 8 classes based on SCS. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear mixed model, which included breed, parity, stage of lactation, SCS class, and their interactions as fixed effects, and herd test day, cow, and residual as random effects. The probability that cows experienced SCS > 4.00 at 30 ± 5, 60 ± 5, or 90 ± 5 d after the observation test day was calculated for each SCS class, and odds ratios to the reference class (−1.00 < SCS ≤ 0.00) were reported. Results showed that the relationship between SCS and milk traits followed a third-order polynomial regression. The average loss of milk, fat, and crude protein yields were 0.43, 0.01, and 0.01 kg/d, respectively, for each SCS unit higher than 1.00. Very low SCS (<−1.00) had detrimental effects on milk yield and quality traits similar to or even stronger than high SCS (>4.00). Moreover, cows with SCS lower than −1.00 on a test day were about 7 times more likely to present high SCS within the following 90 ± 5 d than cows with SCS between −1.00 and 0.00. Breeds responded similarly to the increase of SCS, but the overall loss of fat and crude protein yields, and several minerals among Holstein Friesian were lower with increasing SCS. The best milk yield and quality were observed between SCS 0.00 and 1.00, but milk quality of Holstein Friesians started to decrease at lower SCS compared with milk quality of Brown Swiss and Simmental cows. Results suggest a breed-dependent optimum of SCS, and highlighted that very low SCS can be an indicator of udder health problems and, thus, may be used for early detection of mastitis.

Effects of somatic cell score on milk yield and mid-infrared predicted composition and technological traits of Brown Swiss, Holstein Friesian, and Simmental cattle breeds

Franzoi M.;Manuelian C. L.
;
Penasa M.;De Marchi M.
2020

Abstract

High milk somatic cell count (SCC) influences milk production and quality; however, very little is known about the effect of low SCC on milk quality, especially in terms of mineral content and coagulation properties. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of somatic cell score (SCS), calculated as log2(SCC/100) + 3, on milk yield, composition (fat, crude protein, casein, lactose, milk urea nitrogen, protein fractions, and mineral contents), and coagulation properties of Brown Swiss, Holstein Friesian, and Simmental cows from multibreed herds. Milk composition and coagulation traits were predicted using mid-infrared spectroscopy. The data set comprised 95,591 observations of 6,940 cows in 313 multibreed herds, collected from January 2011 to December 2017. Observations were divided into 8 classes based on SCS. Statistical analysis was performed using a linear mixed model, which included breed, parity, stage of lactation, SCS class, and their interactions as fixed effects, and herd test day, cow, and residual as random effects. The probability that cows experienced SCS > 4.00 at 30 ± 5, 60 ± 5, or 90 ± 5 d after the observation test day was calculated for each SCS class, and odds ratios to the reference class (−1.00 < SCS ≤ 0.00) were reported. Results showed that the relationship between SCS and milk traits followed a third-order polynomial regression. The average loss of milk, fat, and crude protein yields were 0.43, 0.01, and 0.01 kg/d, respectively, for each SCS unit higher than 1.00. Very low SCS (<−1.00) had detrimental effects on milk yield and quality traits similar to or even stronger than high SCS (>4.00). Moreover, cows with SCS lower than −1.00 on a test day were about 7 times more likely to present high SCS within the following 90 ± 5 d than cows with SCS between −1.00 and 0.00. Breeds responded similarly to the increase of SCS, but the overall loss of fat and crude protein yields, and several minerals among Holstein Friesian were lower with increasing SCS. The best milk yield and quality were observed between SCS 0.00 and 1.00, but milk quality of Holstein Friesians started to decrease at lower SCS compared with milk quality of Brown Swiss and Simmental cows. Results suggest a breed-dependent optimum of SCS, and highlighted that very low SCS can be an indicator of udder health problems and, thus, may be used for early detection of mastitis.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3321463
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