Camelina sativa can be identified as a promising oilseed crop due to its short growth cycle, tolerance to drought and frost, low-input requirements, resistance to pests and diseases, feed, and non-feed applications. Compared to other Brassicaceae family plants, camelina is mainly distinguished by high levels of n-3 polyun-saturated fatty acids and antioxidant content. However, camelina contains secondary plant metabolites, such as glucosinolates, phytic acid, sinapine, etc., and their presence limits the use of camelina by-products (oil, seed or cake) in poultry feeding. The breakdown of these compounds forms complexes that can inhibit digestive enzymes, reduce the absorption of nutrients, and ultimately modify product quality. The content of these anti-nutritional compounds and plant seed quality can be modified by various techniques: hybridisation, mutation induction, gene engineering, etc. Moreover, methods such as infrared irradiation, multi-enzyme and copper sup-plementation, etc., can counter or mitigate the effect of plant secondary metabolites present in camelina seed or cake. In general, dietary inclusion of camelina seed or cake at high inclusion levels (> 10%) worsened the nutrient digestibility and thus reduced growth performances. However, carcass traits and meat proximate composition were comparable in birds-fed diets containing camelina by-products. The fatty acid profile of meat cuts and abdomi-nal fat was significantly higher in alpha-linolenic acid and lower n-6/n-3 ratio, thus promoting the healthiness of products for human consumption. Also, the dietary inclusion of camelina did not modify the sensory profile of the products. The present article is a comprehensive and critical review of research carried out to improve the quality of camelina and its by-products to be used in broiler poultry feeding. This review gives information on the feeding value of camelina by-products, as well as a survey of the literature on their use in poultry diets to evaluate digestibility, performance, carcass traits, and meat quality.

Camelina sativa as a sustainable and feasible feedstuff for broiler poultry species: A review

Cullere M.;Dalle Zotte A.
2023

Abstract

Camelina sativa can be identified as a promising oilseed crop due to its short growth cycle, tolerance to drought and frost, low-input requirements, resistance to pests and diseases, feed, and non-feed applications. Compared to other Brassicaceae family plants, camelina is mainly distinguished by high levels of n-3 polyun-saturated fatty acids and antioxidant content. However, camelina contains secondary plant metabolites, such as glucosinolates, phytic acid, sinapine, etc., and their presence limits the use of camelina by-products (oil, seed or cake) in poultry feeding. The breakdown of these compounds forms complexes that can inhibit digestive enzymes, reduce the absorption of nutrients, and ultimately modify product quality. The content of these anti-nutritional compounds and plant seed quality can be modified by various techniques: hybridisation, mutation induction, gene engineering, etc. Moreover, methods such as infrared irradiation, multi-enzyme and copper sup-plementation, etc., can counter or mitigate the effect of plant secondary metabolites present in camelina seed or cake. In general, dietary inclusion of camelina seed or cake at high inclusion levels (> 10%) worsened the nutrient digestibility and thus reduced growth performances. However, carcass traits and meat proximate composition were comparable in birds-fed diets containing camelina by-products. The fatty acid profile of meat cuts and abdomi-nal fat was significantly higher in alpha-linolenic acid and lower n-6/n-3 ratio, thus promoting the healthiness of products for human consumption. Also, the dietary inclusion of camelina did not modify the sensory profile of the products. The present article is a comprehensive and critical review of research carried out to improve the quality of camelina and its by-products to be used in broiler poultry feeding. This review gives information on the feeding value of camelina by-products, as well as a survey of the literature on their use in poultry diets to evaluate digestibility, performance, carcass traits, and meat quality.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11577/3504176
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