The aim of this study was to examine the role of mobile-based student response systems in teaching to improve university students' academic outcomes. Mobile devices can be useful tools for conveying content to large classes, with a potential impact on academic outcomes. This study involved a total of 294 undergraduates taking a psychology course. The course involved lessons in the classroom, which included answering quizzes (quiz activities) and activities such as preparing reports and laboratory experiences (out-of-class activities). Quizzes were administered using a mobile technology system. Data were collected on the motivational beliefs (theory of intelligence) and self-regulated learning strategies of students who voluntarily completed the online questionnaires. The results of the linear models showed that using the quizzes positively affected the performance in the final exams (involving closed and open questions). The same was true for the out-of-class activities. The motivation and strategy scores correlated moderately with out-of-class activities, but not with quiz activities. These results offer insight on the use of technology during lessons and other course-related activities to promote academic achievement.

Using mobile devices in teaching large university classes: how does it affect exam success?

Feraco T.;Casali N.;Tortora C.;Dal Bon C.;Accarrino D.;Meneghetti C.
2020

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the role of mobile-based student response systems in teaching to improve university students' academic outcomes. Mobile devices can be useful tools for conveying content to large classes, with a potential impact on academic outcomes. This study involved a total of 294 undergraduates taking a psychology course. The course involved lessons in the classroom, which included answering quizzes (quiz activities) and activities such as preparing reports and laboratory experiences (out-of-class activities). Quizzes were administered using a mobile technology system. Data were collected on the motivational beliefs (theory of intelligence) and self-regulated learning strategies of students who voluntarily completed the online questionnaires. The results of the linear models showed that using the quizzes positively affected the performance in the final exams (involving closed and open questions). The same was true for the out-of-class activities. The motivation and strategy scores correlated moderately with out-of-class activities, but not with quiz activities. These results offer insight on the use of technology during lessons and other course-related activities to promote academic achievement.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3350945
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact