Students can encounter difficulties in their academic careers, regarding their studying skills, for instance, or experiencing negative emotions. Both are amenable to training and related to one another. This study aimed to examine the efficacy of two interventions focusing on studying skills or emotional skills. Two groups of students with academic difficulties participated: 30 worked on study-related aspects (Study skills group); and the other 30 attended lessons on emotions in everyday life (Emotional skills group). They were tested before and after the training on measures of their motivation to learn, self–regulated learning strategies, and emotions (positive and negative emotions). The results showed that both groups benefited from the training. The Study skills group improved specifically in incremental theory of intelligence (d=0.94, p<0.001), self–regulated learning strategies (organization: d=0.74, p<0.001; elaboration: d=0.58, p<0.001; preparing for exams: d=0.78, p<0.001, specific effects), and more positive emotions about their academic performance (d=0.64, p<0.001, transfer effect). The Emotional skills group showed smaller effects on study-related aspects (0.10≤d≤0.49), with a large effect on negative emotions about the self (d=–.87). These results offer insight on how to approach students’ academic difficulties.

Students with academic difficulties: Benefits of a Study skills group compared to an Emotional skills group.

Chiara Meneghetti;Nicole Casali
;
Mara Fabris;Debora Palamà;Roberta Rizzato;Claudia Zamperlin;Michela Zavagnin;Rossana De Beni
2021

Abstract

Students can encounter difficulties in their academic careers, regarding their studying skills, for instance, or experiencing negative emotions. Both are amenable to training and related to one another. This study aimed to examine the efficacy of two interventions focusing on studying skills or emotional skills. Two groups of students with academic difficulties participated: 30 worked on study-related aspects (Study skills group); and the other 30 attended lessons on emotions in everyday life (Emotional skills group). They were tested before and after the training on measures of their motivation to learn, self–regulated learning strategies, and emotions (positive and negative emotions). The results showed that both groups benefited from the training. The Study skills group improved specifically in incremental theory of intelligence (d=0.94, p<0.001), self–regulated learning strategies (organization: d=0.74, p<0.001; elaboration: d=0.58, p<0.001; preparing for exams: d=0.78, p<0.001, specific effects), and more positive emotions about their academic performance (d=0.64, p<0.001, transfer effect). The Emotional skills group showed smaller effects on study-related aspects (0.10≤d≤0.49), with a large effect on negative emotions about the self (d=–.87). These results offer insight on how to approach students’ academic difficulties.
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.
Pubblicazioni consigliate

Caricamento pubblicazioni consigliate

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11577/3407607
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus ND
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? ND
social impact